X-Men: first class cast, second class film

X-Men: first class cast, second class film

Magneto, Beast, Mystique, Havoc and Proffessor X all come to the silver screen in X-Men First Class.

Marvel Studios

Cody Naccarato, Editor
June 10, 2011
Filed under A&E, Movies, Top Stories

Casting is almost everything in a superhero movie. There is a reason why Tobey Maguire played Spiderman, Jack Nicholson played The Joker, and Patrick Stewart played Professor X. When you have a good cast, it just makes the whole movie come together. But that doesn’t mean that the movie will be good just because the casting was good. X-Men First Class is a hard film to really judge on that premise.

The film focuses on the paths of Erik, and Charles. Erik was raised in Poland, before being taken to a concentration camp. The Nazis got a hold of him, and killed his mother before his own eyes. Erik learned his power to control metal were triggered by anger. At the same time, Charles was raised in wealth and comfort in his mansion in West Chester, New York. The two cross paths, because of a mutual goal. The situation becomes apparent to them, and they are tasked to find a mutant squad, willing to stop Shaw. Some twists and turns occur, with the climax being at the Cuban Missile crisis, where the story tells the mutant involvement.

James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender are too very strong leads for this movie. They provide the stability, leadership, and connection that you know had occurred at one point between Professor X, and Magneto. They are also too very great actors that play their parts very well. My heart still goes out to Patrick Stewart, but as a representation of the characters it gives people the real picture. It shows people the reality. Magneto isn’t the bad guy, he’s just the antagonist in the X-Men universe. And his experiences show a very logical explanation to his bitterness.

Kevin Bacon plays Sebastian Shaw, the movies main antagonist (along with those damn Ruskies!) I don’t know what’s funnier. The fact that Kevin Bacon has nothing better to do these days, then star in an X-Men movie, or the fact that he plays a Nazi. I guess his performance is comparable to Footloose, if you take out the dancing, and include a metal helmet.

The movie exhibits some of the more well known mutants, such as Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) and Hank McCoy as “Beast” (Nicholas Hoult). It shows a romance, that I don’t necessarily remember… but hey, I guess I can’t know everything right? You also get to see Hugh Jackman, in a on screen cameo. It’s by far the funniest scene in the movie, and it lasts all of four seconds, as he tells Charles and Erik (Professor X and Magneto) to go “*Insert explicit word here* off.”

It also takes the time to show some lesser known mutants, such as Angel, Darwin, Banshee, and Havoc. I feel like the introduction of characters is similar to a John Steinbeck novel. You get a very great picture painted for you, very quickly. You have a good understanding of all the mutants, without having prior knowledge of them. You could walk into this film, unaware of what X-Men even is, and you’d be very content and able to follow the film.

As a film it makes me happy. It’s a good representation of the characters, their traits (both human and mutant alike) and really takes enough time to explain where each mutant’s position is on soon to come mutant war. It sets the stage for the universe we know ahead, but does it pay homage to what we all know and understand?

I don’t really understand some things about the movie. I don’t feel like it is a direct reflection of what was going on based on the comic books. I don’t feel like it represents the events correctly enough. To be honest, I didn’t think Havoc was with the original X-Men. I always thought he was there before Cyclops (his brother) but never thought that early. That’d make him considerably older than Scott, which doesn’t seem to make sense at all to me.

The quirks of the movie do irk me to no end. But it’s understandable that when you make a movie, that you have to just make sense on screen. Marvel makes some very great superhero films, and I think that’s what they hope to accomplish. At the same time, they have Stan Lee as an executive producer, so I can’t imagine that he lets them stray too far off from the path right?

The film focuses on the paths of Erik, and Charles. Erik was raised in Poland, before being taken to a concentration camp. The Nazi’s got a hold of him, and killed his mother before his own eyes. Erik learned his power to control metal were triggered by anger. At the same time, Charles was raised in wealth and comfort in his mansion in West Chester, New York. The two cross paths, because of a mutual goal. The situation becomes apparent to them, and they are tasked to find a mutant squad, willing to stop Shaw.

Overall, the film is good. I don’t absolutely hate it, it just doesn’t make a lot of sense to me from a superhero movie perspective. On a more, “Summer Blockbuster” kind of sense, it’s very enjoyable. Comics make me angry, as they always do. I guess I’ll never be completely satisfied. Just like Harry Potter fans will never be completely satisfied. Because of all these things and more, X-Men First Class gets 4 out of 5. I can’t condemn a movie for a standard, that the rest of the world is not ready to follow.

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